Monday, April 20, 2015

The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals (version 2)

I, with my coathors, have submitted a new draft of our paper "The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals". This paper is substantially modified from its previous incarnation. Here is the main argument:
"[C]onfidence intervals may not be used as suggested by modern proponents because this usage is not justified by confidence interval theory. If used in the way CI proponents suggest, some CIs will provide severely misleading inferences for the given data; other CIs will not. Because such considerations are outside of CI theory, developers of CIs do not test them, and it is therefore often not known whether a given CI yields a reasonable inference or not. For this reason, we believe that appeal to CI theory is redundant in the best cases, when inferences can be justified outside CI theory, and unwise in the worst cases, when they cannot."
The document, source code, and all supplementary material is available here on github.

Friday, April 17, 2015

Guidelines for reporting confidence intervals

I'm working on a manuscript on confidence intervals, and I thought I'd share a draft section on the reporting of confidence intervals. The paper has several demonstrations of how CIs may, or may not, offer quality inferences, and how they can differ markedly from credible intervals, even ones with so-called "non-informative" priors.

Friday, April 10, 2015

All about that "bias, bias, bias" (it's no trouble)

At some point, everyone who fiddles around with Bayes factors with point nulls notices something that, at first blush, seems strange: small effect sizes seem “biased” toward the null hypothesis. In null hypothesis significance testing, power simply increases when you change the true effect size. With Bayes factors, there is a non-monotonicity where increasing the sample size will slightly increase the degree to which a small effect size favors the null, then the small effect size becomes evidence for the alternative. I recall puzzling with this with Jeff Rouder years ago when drafting our 2009 paper on Bayesian t tests.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Some thoughts on replication

In a recent blog post, Simine Vazire discusses the problem with the logic of requiring replicators to explain when they reach different conclusions to the original authors. She frames it, correctly, it as asking people to over-interpret random noise. Vazire identifies the issue as a problem with our thinking: that we under-estimate randomness. I'd like to explore other ways in which our biases interferes with clear thinking about replication, and perhaps suggest some ways we can clarify it.

I suggest two ways in which we fool ourselves in thinking about replication: the concept of "replication" is unnecessarily asymmetric and an example of overly-linear thinking, and lack of distinction in practice causing a lack of distinction in theory.

My favorite Neyman passage: on confidence intervals

I've been doing a lot of reading on confidence interval theory. Some of the reading is more interesting than others. There is one passage from Neyman's (1952) book "Lectures and Conferences on Mathematical Statistics and Probability" (available here) that stands above the rest in terms of clarity, style, and humor. I had not read this before the last draft of our confidence interval paper, but for those of you who have read it, you'll recognize that this is the style I was going for. Maybe you have to be Jerzy Neyman to get away with it.

Neyman gets bonus points for the footnote suggesting the "eminent", "elderly" boss is so obtuse (a reference to Fisher?) and that the young frequentists should be "remind[ed] of the glory" of being burned at the stake. This is just absolutely fantastic writing. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.